SAINT AUGUSTINE, FLORIDA

Curator’s Tour – March 1, 2017, 10 a.m.

Light Up with the Lightner

Lightner Museum Curator Barry Myers conducts monthly tours featuring unique and special treasures of the Museum. The tours are the first Wednesday of each month at 10am and offer guests an intimate encounter with a select few of the Lightner’s eclectic relics.

Inhale knowledge at March’s Curator’s Tour which will highlight the art of tobacco accoutrements and their finery from the turn of the 19th century to the 1920’s and beyond. Guests will get an in-depth glance of Otto Lightner’s collection of everything tobacco related from art, smoking etiquette, accessories, and the history of this popular past time.

 

 

Tobacco jar, circa 1880. Often confused with cookie jars, tobacco jars were used to keep tobacco fresh and from drying out. During the mid 19th century, many tobacco jars were being made in amusing shapes such as historical figures and animals.
Tobacco jar, circa 1880. Often confused with cookie jars, tobacco jars were used to keep tobacco fresh and from drying out. During the mid 19th century, many tobacco jars were being made in amusing shapes such as historical figures and animals.

 

Tours are included in the price of admission and will begin in the front lobby of the Museum at 10am the first Wednesday of each month. Admission is free for St. Johns County residents with valid identification.

This tour will be a co-lecture given by Lightner Museum Director Robert Harper and Lightner Museum Curator Barry Myers.

 

Pipe in original pipe case circa 1830.
Pipe in original pipe case circa 1830.

 

 

Before the invention of the safety match in 1855, matches were kept in match boxes and carried in pocket-sized match safes because they ignited so easily. From that time, match holders have been made in whimsical figural and decorative forms, and occasionally used for advertisement.
Before the invention of the safety match in 1855, matches were kept in match boxes and carried in pocket-sized match safes because they ignited so easily. From that time, match holders have been made in whimsical figural and decorative forms, and occasionally used for advertisement.

 

We will be approaching the topic of smoking from an artistic perspective only, there will be

no smoking at the Lightner Museum.

Donations are appreciated and will be accepted after the tour.

The Lightner Museum is a non-profit cultural institution sustained by the generous support of individuals, businesses and sponsors.